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Upcoming Events

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What's New

What's New

diocese of orlando - The year of the eucharist

Taken from the the diocesan website:

The Diocese of Orlando was established on June 18, 1968 and celebrates its 50th anniversary. The diocese is comprised of 79 parishes and 12 missions, two basilicas, 37 schools, and hundreds of ministries. Led locally by our fifth Bishop, Most Reverend John Noonan, the clergy, consecrated women and men, and members of Christ’s faithful strive to live the Gospel of Jesus Christ by participating in the Sacraments, studying the Word of God, praying always and in all ways, teaching the faith and caring for those in need. As a thriving and growing community of Catholic faithful, the Diocese of Orlando represents many cultural and ethnic groups, believers of all ages, income levels and education. But they all are united in the universal Catholic Church. In addition to English, Mass is celebrated in the Diocese of Orlando in nine foreign languages: Portuguese, African, Filipino, Spanish, Polish, Korean, Malayalam, Vietnamese, and Creole. We come together for Mass to meet our Savior at the table of the Lord. The Eucharist being the source and summit of Catholic life which unifies and sustains the community of faith, it is right and proper for the Bishop to establish a Jubilee Year of the Eucharist, to enkindle a deeper faith, to form leaders in Christ, and to harmonize ministries in the mission of the Church concurrent with this golden anniversary. The theme for the year is “Stay with us, Lord” based on Luke 24:13-35 describing the Road to Emmaus when disciples urged our Lord, “’Stay with us, for it is nearly evening and the day is almost over.’ So he went in to stay with them. And it happened that, while he was with them at table, he took bread, said the blessing, broke it, and gave it to them. With that their eyes were opened and they recognized him, but he vanished from their sight.” 

In commemoration of this jubilee year, we too will celebrate this special year with focus on the Eucharist.  Please check our bulletin and website regularly for more information.

For more information about diocesan events, please visit: Jubilee Year of the Eucharist



8 Ways to Pray During Lent


What do we do when we’re facing an upcoming big event, celebration, or special occasion in our lives? We prepare for it. Holy Week and Easter are “big events” in the liturgical year of the Church and in the spiritual life of a Christian. So, as Christians, we prepare spiritually for these through the forty days of Lent. This means that, during Lent, we rededicate ourselves to prayer.

There are as many ways to pray as there are pray-ers in this world, but a few prayer methods can help us in particular to spiritually prepare ourselves during Lent:

1. Make your abstinence a prayer-in-action.

As Catholics we are called to give up something for Lent. Chocolate, coffee, that extra helping of dinner, one less hour of video games or watching DVDs—whatever it is, you can make what you’re giving up for Lent a prayer as well: a prayer-in-action. Whenever you encounter the thing you are abstaining from or the time of day that you would normally enjoy it, take a moment to say a prayer in recognition of your wholeness in God even without the thing you have given up. Thank God for the freedom to be wholly yourself without this and, at the same time, acknowledge the gift of its existence in the world. 

2. Renew yourself through personal reflective prayer.

Lent is a time of spiritual renewal. One easy step you can take is to use the many free online resources to jump-start or reinvigorate your prayer life. A few such resources are Loyola Press’s popular 3-Minute Retreats and Seven Last Words of Christ guided meditation, or try the prayer reflections offered by the Irish Jesuit site Sacred Space. If you’re seeking more traditional support for your personal reflective prayer, consider a book specially designed to nourish you during Lent, such as Praying Lent.

3. Pray the Stations of the Cross.

One of the most common traditions of Lent is to pray the Stations of the Cross. This prayer helps us reflect on the passion and death of Christ in preparation for Good Friday observance and the Easter celebration. Check your local parish Web site or bulletin for listings of when a Stations of the Cross prayer service is being offered, or try one of the many online resources available.

4. Meditate on Holy Scripture with Lectio Divina. 

Perhaps the oldest method of scriptural prayer known to Christians is lectio divina or “holy reading.” This method of prayer is characterized by the slow reading and consideration of a text from Scripture, with repetition and meditation on key words or phrases. Lectio divina is rooted in the belief that the scriptural word speaks in the human heart as the word of God and can reveal the thoughts of our hearts in response to God. In this way, lectio divina leads to a deeper communion with the Divine.

5. Reflect deeper on your liturgical prayer. 

When you attend Mass during Lent, be conscious of and meditate on the words you pray in the liturgy. For example, the Eucharistic Prayer, the highlight of each Mass, has special significance during Lent. After receiving communion, you may want to sit and reflect more deeply on this great prayer of the Church.

6. Join or start a prayer group. 

There are many benefits to praying with others. In group prayer you’re able to offer and experience a positive example, needed support and encouragement, different perspectives, and the inspiration to grow in the Christian life. A simple way to get started is to invite your spouse, a family member, or close friend to pray with you on a regular basis throughout Lent. You can also contact your local parish and inquire about prayer groups or prayer circles being sponsored. Or start your own communal prayer group. For example, the Meeting Christ In Prayer kit offers step-by-step instructions, guides, and all the necessary resources so even a beginner can start praying with others.

7. Pray with children or as a family. 

Being a parent, guardian, or teacher is a holy ministry and a sacred promise. Share your faith with children by letting them see and hear you pray, and by praying together. Guided Reflections for Children: Praying My FaithPraying with Scriptures, and 52 Simple Ways to Talk with Your Kids about Faith are all practical, realistic resources to help you make the most of your prayertime with children. And don’t forget about family dinners. Dinnertime is a great opportunity to start or enliven a tradition of family prayer during Lent. For more children’s prayer resources, click here.

8. Start a practice of daily prayer that will last after Lent. 

Perhaps the best prayer advice is to use Lent as a time to instill prayer habits that will last long after Lent has concluded. Resources such as yearly prayer guides—for example, A Prayer Book of Catholic Devotions can get you started and help you stay consistent.

So enjoy your Lenten prayer.  And don’t think you have to do all the above.  Perhaps choose one or two of these prayer methods to concentrate on—and then you can more fully experience the pilgrim journey toward Easter that is Lent.

Online Giving!

We invite you to consider our new electronic giving program as a way to automate your regular weekly offerings.

Electronic giving is convenient for you and provides much-needed consistency for our church. There is no cost for you to participate.

As an example, if you are currently giving on a weekly basis, you will no longer need to write out 52 checks a year, instead you can set up online donations and simply drop your empty envelope into the basket each week as an attendance record. And when illness, or other circumstances prevent you from attending mass, this program will allow your weekly offerings to continue on an uninterrupted basis.

To find out more about our exciting new service, click here.

Our Catholic Appeal

"Blessed are they who follow the law of the Lord!"

"To listen to the Word is to have a personal encounter with God.  Psalm 119 guides us towards the Gospel and fulfillment of the law of Jesus Christ.  The Lord and His Word are our 'land' in which we live in communion and joy.

Each year during Our Catholic Appeal, you affirm the Lord and His Word by your generous response in supporting the ministries of the Diocese of Orlando.  You open your hearts to the gift of these ministries because they help each one of you to live more fully in God's Law and to prosper our land with His majestic love. From honoring the divinity of each life, to teaching people of all ages about our faith, to sharing our resources with those who are alone or in need, to holding our parishes accountable for your stewardship in the Lord's name, these ministries bring forth God's law in our land."

Click here to

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Our Community

Our Community


Mission Statement

We nurture the spiritual lives of our family of believers by leading and inspiring each other to be true Christian disciples.

Our Goals

To deepen and enhance the spiritual life of the parish through liturgy, personal prayer, and devotions.

To provide religious education and spiritual formation. 

To minister to those within the parish family and community.

To reach out to returning Catholics and unchurched persons.

To deepen our commitment to stewardship of prayer, time and talent, and treasure.

To celebrate our diversity and our commonality.

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Parish History

Sts. Peter & Paul Parish was established on July 27, 1967. We celebrated our first Mass on August 13, 1967, on the grounds of Camp San Pedro. During the following two years, Pastor Michael Troy and 200 families were a community on the road, celebrating Mass in San Pedro Center, New Hope Baptist Church and Aloma Elementary School. On November 1, 1969, we celebrated the first Mass in the domed recreational building. It served not only as our church, but also the rectory, church offices, ministry meeting room and community auditorium.